Ninja is leaving Twitch for Microsoft’s Mixer

Ninja is leaving Twitch for Microsoft’s Mixer

2:01pm, 1st August, 2019
Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, the biggest streamer ever, has today announced his intention to leave the platform in favor of Microsoft’s Mixer. Twitch is far and away the biggest video game streaming platform on the internet, claiming 72 percent of all hours watched according to . Mixer, by comparison, owns 3 percent, which is approximately 112 million viewership hours this most recent quarter. is owned by following an , back when Mixer was called Beam. Interestingly enough, won the Disrupt NY Battlefield competition in 2016. Twitch offered this statement to the : We’ve loved watching Ninja on Twitch over the years and are proud of all that he’s accomplished for himself and his family, and the gaming community. We wish him the best of luck in his future endeavors. Surprisingly quickly, Twitch took away Ninja’s ‘Partnered’ check mark, the Twitch equivalent of a verified blue tick. Damn they snagged this mans checkmark QUICK — 100T Mako (@Mako) Ninja announced the news via video: The announcement is very light on reasons why Ninja might have moved from his longtime home at Twitch over to Microsoft. It’s possible (and likely?) that Mixer offered the streaming star an enormous amount of money to make the move, which could signal the beginning of a new wave of payouts for mega streaming stars — not unlike the current NBA free agency bonanza, which has seen the migration of superstars to marquee franchises in order to form basketball equivalents of supergroups. It’s also worth wondering who reigns supreme in this equation: players or platforms? Luckily, we’ll find out quickly as the video game streaming space sees its biggest talent shakeup since the industry’s inception.
Former Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene and longtime Google CEO Eric Schmidt leaving Alphabet’s board of directors

Former Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene and longtime Google CEO Eric Schmidt leaving Alphabet’s board of directors

4:25pm, 30th April, 2019
Google Cloud CEO Diane Greene discusses bringing customers like Target on board at Cloud Next 2018. (Google Photo) Two long-serving members of Alphabet’s board of directors who also played prominent roles as executives at the company plan to leave its board in June, Alphabet announced Tuesday. The board of directors at Google’s parent company is saying goodbye to Eric Schmidt, installed as CEO to provide “” way back in 2001, and Diane Greene, the VMware co-founder who ran Google Cloud from 2015 until late last year. that Robin Washington, executive vice president and chief financial officer at Gilead Sciences, will be joining the board. Former Alphabet Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt (Photo courtesy / ) Schmidt came to Google after leading Novell through some tumultuous battles with Microsoft in the late 1990s. His job was to develop a pre-IPO Google, led by its young founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, into a more professional organization, and it’s fair to say that all worked out pretty well for Google’s investors. Schmidt turned Google back over to Page in 2011, and stepped down from the executive chairman position in 2018. While serving on Alphabet’s board, Greene was tapped in 2015 to lead a revival of Google Cloud, which had struggled to connect with corporate customers despite (or perhaps due to) its technical prowess. Google’s cloud business grew under her watch, but never quite shed that reputation, remaining a distant third behind Amazon Web Services and Microsoft in the public cloud computing market. as Google Cloud CEO last November, and was replaced by former Oracle executive Thomas Kurian.